An difríocht idir athruithe ar: "Nion (ogham)"

→‎Interpretation: ... ag eagrú
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(→‎Interpretation: ... ag eagrú)
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==Interpretation==
'' The glossators of the [[OgamAn TractLeabhar Oghaim]] and the [[Auraicept na n-Éces]] seem to refer to at least two Irish words ''nin'', meaning "part of a weaver's loom", and "a wave". The corresponding adjective ''ninach'' is glossed as ''gablach'' and used as a synonym of [[cross]], and the word seems to be roughly synonymous with ''gabul'' "fork, forked branch",. and It is thus a plausible base for a name for "Ogham letters", which after all (at least the consonants), look like forks or combs. The second ''nin'' seems to be cognate with Welsh ''nen'' "roof, heaven", with a meaning of "loftiness", with an adjective ''ninach'' "lofty". The kennings are explained by the glossators that weavers' beams were erected as signs of peace. The "arboreal" tradition claims the word as [[ash-tree]], concluding that looms were made of ashwood. In some instances, the association with ashwood, which is best known as the raw material for spears, the kenning was amended to "destruction of peace". McManus (1988) suggests that the word for "forked branch" was applied to the olive branch, the shaking of which in Irish tradition requested an interruption of a battle. The kennings related to beauty, on the other hand, are maybe somehow dependent on the second meaning of "lofty".
 
''The second ''nin'' seems to be cognate with Welsh ''nen'' "roof, heaven", with a meaning of "loftiness", with an adjective ''ninach'' "lofty". The kennings are explained by the glossators that weavers' beams were erected as signs of peace.
 
''The "arboreal" tradition claims the word as [[ash-tree]], concluding that looms were made of ashwood. In some instances, the association with ashwood, which is best known as the raw material for spears, the kenning was amended to "destruction of peace". McManus (1988) suggests that the word for "forked branch" was applied to the olive branch, the shaking of which in Irish tradition requested an interruption of a battle.
 
''The kennings related to beauty, on the other hand, are maybe somehow dependent on the second meaning of "lofty".
 
==Bríatharogam==
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