An difríocht idir athruithe ar: "Osraige"

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''The tribal name ''Osraige'' means "muintir na n-os", and is traditionally claimed to be taken from the name of the ruling dynasty's semi-legendary pre-Christian founder, [[Óengus Osrithe|Aonghas Osraithe]].<ref>Genealogies from [[Rawlinson B 502]], [[Corpus of Electronic Texts]], ll. 15–16</ref><ref name="maryjones1">{{
''The tribal name ''Osraige'' means "people of the deer", and is traditionally claimed to be taken from the name of the ruling dynasty's semi-legendary pre-Christian founder, [[Óengus Osrithe]].<ref>Genealogies from Rawlinson B 502, at CELT, pg 15–16</ref><ref name="maryjones1">{{cite web |url=http://www.maryjones.us/ctexts/fitness_of_names.html |title=Cσir Anmann: Fitness of Names |website=Maryjones.us |accessdate=2017-03-16 |url-status=live |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20160303202314/http://www.maryjones.us/ctexts/fitness_of_names.html |archivedate=3 March 2016 |df=dmy-all }}</ref> The Osraige were probably either a southern branch of the [[Ulaid]] or [[Dál Fiatach]] of [[Ulster]],<ref>Byrne, p. 201</ref> or close kin to their former [[Corcu Loígde]] allies.<ref>Ó Néill, 'Osraige'; Doherty, 'Érainn'</ref> In either case it would appear they should properly be counted among the [[Érainn]]. Some scholars believe that the [[Ō]] pedigree of the Osraige is a fabrication, invented to help them achieve their goals in Leinster. [[Francis John Byrne]] suggests that it may date from the time of Cerball mac Dúnlainge.<ref>Byrne, p. 163</ref> The Osraighe themselves claimed to be descended from the [[Érainn]] people, although scholars propose that the Ivernic groups included the Osraige. Prior to the coming of Christianity to Ireland, the Osraige and their relatives the Corcu Loígde appear to have been the dominant political groups in Munster, before the rise of the [[Eóganachta]] marginalized them both.<ref>Charles-Edwards, ''Early Christian Ireland'', p. 541</ref>
lua idirlín |
url=http://www.maryjones.us/ctexts/fitness_of_names.html |
teideal=Cσir Anmann: Fitness of Names |website=Maryjones.us |accessdate=2017-03-16 |url-status=live |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20160303202314/http://www.maryjones.us/ctexts/fitness_of_names.html |archivedate=3 March 2016 |df=dmy-all
}}</ref> The Osraí were probably either a southern branch of the [[Ulaid]] nó [[Dál Fiatach]],<ref>Byrne, lch. 201</ref> or close kin to their former [[Corcu Loígde|Corca Laidhe]] allies.<ref>Ó Néill, 'Osraige'</ref><ref>Doherty, 'Érainn'</ref> In either case it would appear they should properly be counted among the [[Éarainn]]. The Osraighe themselves claimed to be descended from the Éarainn people, although scholars propose that the Ivernic groups included the Osraige.
 
''[[Tolamaes]] 2nd-century [[Geografaíocht (Tolamaes)|léarscáil]] na hÉireann places a tribe he called the [[Usdiae]] roughly in the same area that the Osraí occupied.<ref>''Ptolemy's map of Ireland: a modern decoding.'' R. Darcy, William Flynn. Irish Geography Iml. 41, Eag. 1, 2008. Léarscáil 1.</ref> The territory indicated by Tolamaes likely included the major late [[Iarannaois]] hill-fort at [[Cnoc Ghráinseach Chúil Phobail]] and a 1st-century Roman burial site at [[Áth Stúin]], both in Contae Chill Chainnigh.<ref name="culturalheritageireland">{{
''[[Ptolemy]]'s 2nd-century map of Ireland places a tribe he called the "Usdaie" roughly in the same area that the Osraige occupied.<ref>''Ptolemy's map of Ireland: a modern decoding.'' R. Darcy, William Flynn. Irish Geography Vol. 41, Iss. 1, 2008. Figure 1.</ref> The territory indicated by Ptolemy likely included the major late [[Iron Age]] hill-fort at Freestone Hill and a 1st-century Roman burial site at Stonyford, both in County Kilkenny.<ref name="culturalheritageireland">{{cite web|url=http://www.culturalheritageireland.ie/index.php/irelands-top-100-heritage-discoveries/81-irelands-top-100-heritage-discoveries/144-heritage-discoveries-the-roman-burial-from-stoneyford-co-kilkenny|publisher=culturalheritageireland.ie|title=Heritage Discoveries: The Roman Burial from Stoneyford, Co. Kilkenny|accessdate=14 February 2017|url-status=live|archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20170215200145/http://www.culturalheritageireland.ie/index.php/irelands-top-100-heritage-discoveries/81-irelands-top-100-heritage-discoveries/144-heritage-discoveries-the-roman-burial-from-stoneyford-co-kilkenny|archivedate=15 February 2017|df=dmy-all}}</ref> Due to inland water access via the Nore, Barrow and Suir rivers, the Osraige may have experienced greater intercourse with Britain and the continent, and there appears to have been some heightened Roman trading activity in and around the region.<ref name="academia1970">{{cite web |url=https://www.academia.edu/9193361 |title=The Tri-River Region: The geographic key to lasting change in Ireland - Eóghan Mac Giolla Phádraig |website=Academia.edu |date=1970-01-01 |accessdate=2017-03-16 |url-status=live |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20180514235359/http://www.academia.edu/9193361/The_Tri-River_Region_The_geographic_key_to_lasting_change_in_Ireland |archivedate=14 May 2018 |df=dmy-all }}</ref> Such contact with the Roman world may have precipitated wider exposure and later conversion to [[Early Christianity]].
lua idirlín |
url=http://www.culturalheritageireland.ie/index.php/irelands-top-100-heritage-discoveries/81-irelands-top-100-heritage-discoveries/144-heritage-discoveries-the-roman-burial-from-stoneyford-co-kilkenny|publisher=culturalheritageireland.ie|
teideal=Heritage Discoveries: The Roman Burial from Stoneyford, Co. Kilkenny|accessdate=14 February 2017|url-status=live|archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20170215200145/http://www.culturalheritageireland.ie/index.php/irelands-top-100-heritage-discoveries/81-irelands-top-100-heritage-discoveries/144-heritage-discoveries-the-roman-burial-from-stoneyford-co-kilkenny|archivedate=15 February 2017|df=dmy-all
}}</ref> Due to inland water access via the [[an Fheoir]], [[an Bhearú]] agus [[an tSiúir]], the Osraí may have experienced greater intercourse with [[an Bhreatain]] and the continent, and there appears to have been some heightened Roman trading activity in and around the region.<ref name="academia1970">{{
lua idirlín |
url=https://www.academia.edu/9193361 |
teideal=The Tri-River Region: The geographic key to lasting change in Ireland - Eóghan Mac Giolla Phádraig |website=Academia.edu |date=1970-01-01 |accessdate=2017-03-16 |url-status=live |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20180514235359/http://www.academia.edu/9193361/The_Tri-River_Region_The_geographic_key_to_lasting_change_in_Ireland |archivedate=14 May 2018 |df=dmy-all
}}</ref> Such contact with the Roman world may have precipitated wider exposure and later conversion to [[Críostaíocht|Luath-Chríostaíocht]].
 
''Prior to the coming of Christianity to Ireland, the Osraí and their relatives the Corca Laidhe appear to have been the dominant political groups in Munster, before the rise of the [[Eoghanachta]] marginalized them both.<ref>Charles-Edwards, ''Early Christian Ireland'', lch. 541</ref>
''From the fifth century, the name ''[[Dál Birn]]'' ("''the people of Birn''"; sometimes spelled ''dál mBirn'') appears to have emerged as the name for the ruling lineage of Osraige, and this name remained in use through to the twelfth century. From this period, Osraige was originally within the sphere of the province of Leinster.
 
''From the fifth century, the name ''[[Dál Birn]]'' ("''the people of Birn''"; sometimes spelled ''dálDál mBirn'') appears to have emerged as the name for the ruling lineage of OsraigeOsraí, and this name remained in use through to the twelfth century. From this period, OsraigeOsraí was originally within the sphere of the province of Leinster. Some scholars believe that the [[Ō]] pedigree of the Osraige is a fabrication, invented to help them achieve their goals in Leinster. [[Francis John Byrne]] suggests that it may date from the time of [[Cerball mac Dúnlainge|Cearbhall mac Dúnlainge]] sa 9ú haois.<ref>Byrne, lch. 163</ref>
 
===Forghabh Dhéise, Chorca Laidhe agus Críostaíocht (c. 450 – 625)===